Summer Substance Abuse

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Students’ long wait for summer is over as both temperatures and free time are on the rise. However, with the influx of free time also comes the increased temptation to experiment with drugs and alcohol.

Studies show teens are more likely to experiment with drugs and alcohol in the months of June and July. A report published by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration showed during June and July, 11,000 teens use alcohol for the first time, 5,000 have their first cigarette, and 4,500 try marijuana for the first time.

For parents, it is important to talk with your teen or adolescent about the dangers of drug use, and be aware of indicators of current substance abuse. Some common symptoms are bloodshot eyes, avoiding eye contact, missed curfews, unusual tiredness, and loss of interest in activities they once enjoyed. Though some symptoms may seem like normal teenage behavior, open conversations with your teen may be the first line of defense for drug prevention. Don’t be afraid to set boundaries and monitor their activities, and be an active and loving participant in their life.

If your teen admits to experimenting with drugs, it is important that you do not overreact. This may cut off communication and make it difficult for them to be open with you in the future. Lovingly educate them on the importance of abstaining from drugs, assess the severity of the issue during the conversation, and seek professional help if needed. Your loving support plays a vital role in their recovery.

You are not alone in the fight against drug and alcohol addiction. If your teen is suffering from substance abuse, call us today at (888) 507-1355 for a free, confidential assessment with one of our trained treatment specialists. We can connect you with more resources on teen substance abuse and provide a treatment plan catered to your unique needs.

“In the depth of winter I finally learned that there was in me an invincible summer.”

– Albert Camus